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Home closings increase in 2020 along coastal SC counties despite COVID pandemic | Myrtle Beach Business

Myrtle Beach Realtor Travis Muir put a condo up for sale in September at Blue Water Resort on Ocean Boulevard and within an hour, it was sold.

Not an every day occurrence, the realtor for The Hoffman Group admits. But, after all, it’s 2020 and anything can happen.

“The biggest thing is pricing it within realistic market price,” Muir said, adding 2020 has been his best year for sales, pushing nearly triple what he normally does.

“With this one being an investment property, the price point for the rate of return… I think one of the biggest things, too, is the interest rates are lower than they have been in a very long time. That gives people more incentive to go ahead and make that jump. They were thinking of buying in a two- or three-year window, but now with the interest rates so low, people are moving faster.”

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Funeral Home Hands out Flyers at COVID Denier Protest

An Italian funeral home handed out flyers advertising its services at a ‘March of Liberation’ rally for COVID-deniers in Rome on Saturday.



a group of people standing in front of a building: A woman with a sign saying "it's a dictatorship not a pandemic" participates at Let's Free Italy!, Liberation March for Work, Income, Sovereignty, Democracy, in Piazza San Giovanni on October 10, 2020, in Rome, Italy. A man handed out flyers advertising a local funeral home at the protest in Rome.


© Simona Granati-Corbis/Getty
A woman with a sign saying “it’s a dictatorship not a pandemic” participates at Let’s Free Italy!, Liberation March for Work, Income, Sovereignty, Democracy, in Piazza San Giovanni on October 10, 2020, in Rome, Italy. A man handed out flyers advertising a local funeral home at the protest in Rome.

On Twitter, the Taffo funeral home shared a photo of a man handing out flyers at the rally and simply said: “Flyer for the March of Liberation! Business is Business.”

The organizers of the rally say it was held in protest of the government, the European Union, and neoliberalism, and while organizers said that they do not deny the existence of the coronavirus, they denounce its political use and appear to deny the severity of

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winners and losers in the COVID economy

Although European capitals are loath to reintroduce the national lockdowns imposed in March, they are targeting restrictions on hospitality, entertainment and travel.

“No government wants to go back to where they were in March given the impact on the economy,” said Melanie Debono, European economist at Capital Economics. “But any restrictions may take longer to unwind so the virus doesn’t uptick again.”

Where we have seen policies to contain the virus, people have quickly returned to normal.

— Frederic Neumann, HSBC

By contrast, countries in the Asia-Pacific region – including New Zealand and Vietnam as well as Taiwan, South Korea and China – suppressed COVID-19 to lower levels and then maintained tighter controls against a resurgence. While Europe enjoyed its summer holidays, Asia kept international travel on hold.

Taiwan closed its borders early and followed that up with well-organised contact tracing, quarantine and social distancing to eliminate a few initial

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Home saliva COVID tests are just as accurate as nasal swabs

As the pandemic rages on, research on different types of coronavirus tests continues in an effort to increase testing capacity and minimize contact with others.

Many Americans are familiar with the uncomfortable experience of having a 6-inch cotton swab poked deep in their nasal cavities, but there are also tests that can be completed at home that involve a simple spit in a tube — and they are just as accurate and reliable as their more painful counterpart, experts say.

Ever since the first emergency use authorization was issued for an at-home saliva-based COVID-19 test in May, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued more for companies across the country.

Experts say they are easier to process in the lab, more comfortable for the patient and safer for health care professionals. The downside? Most at-home coronavirus saliva tests are costly, and in some cases, your insurance won’t cover the

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Maker of At-Home Covid Test Seeks Funds at $1 Billion Valuation

(Bloomberg) — Everlywell Inc., a health startup that sells a Covid-19 home-testing kit, is in talks to raise fresh capital at a valuation of $1 billion or more.



a close up of a hand holding a blue object: A doctor wearing surgical gloves holds test tubes containing saliva swabs during coronavirus symptom tests in the outpatient clinic at the Paracelsus Clinic in Zwickau, Germany, on Thursday, April 2, 2020.


© Bloomberg
A doctor wearing surgical gloves holds test tubes containing saliva swabs during coronavirus symptom tests in the outpatient clinic at the Paracelsus Clinic in Zwickau, Germany, on Thursday, April 2, 2020.

Prospective investors including venture capital firms are participating in the discussions, according to a person familiar with the matter who asked not to be named. The company reached a valuation of $175 million after a fundraising round last year, according to Pitchbook estimates.

The latest effort, if successful, would vault Everlywell to unicorn status, giving it a lead among niche telehealth startups that are rushing to expand. The global pandemic has been a boon for such companies as patients seek to avoid the risk of visiting a doctor.

A

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Stock picks to buy, 7 food companies benefiting from COVID: Stifel

  • With President Trump and the First Lady testing positive for COVID-19 and new cases rising week over week, the work-from-home and eat-at-home routine could last longer than many had expected.
  • The packaged-food industry enjoyed an initial boom during the March grocery hoarding phase and has continued to grow at an above-normal rate as the pandemic persists. 
  • After conducting a comprehensive pricing and volume analysis, Stifel analysts handpicked seven food stocks poised to grow their sales and gain market share even as the economy gradually reopens. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Just when Americans were getting ready for a coronavirus vaccine and starting to retrieve parts of their pre-pandemic lives, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19.

As new cases continue to rise week over week, according to the COVID Tracking Project, the pandemic-induced work-from-home routine could stretch even longer than many had expected. 

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COVID rapid at-home antigen testing may get FDA approval

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COVID-19 widespread testing is crucial to fighting the pandemic, but is there enough testing? The answer is in the positivity rates.

USA TODAY

Even as advocates cite bureaucratic red tape blocking fast and cheap home coronavirus tests, the federal government’s regulatory agency overseeing testing says it will be flexible and encourage developers to seek approval.

The Food and Drug Administration issued a document on July 29 calling for home tests to correctly identify the virus at least 90% of the time. But a high-ranking FDA official overseeing testing told USA TODAY the agency will consider tests with lower sensitivity. 

Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said the agency’s recommendations issued more than two months ago are “starting points.”  

“Our door has been open, and we’re very flexible because we’re trying to do all we can, at least from an FDA side, to have

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Lowe’s gives hourly workers more bonuses amid COVID

Lowe’s Home Improvement employees are getting another round of bonuses amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

All full-time hourly workers will get $300 and part-time and seasonal employees will receive $150 on Oct. 16, Lowe’s Companies said Wednesday in a news release. The Mooresville-based company gave similar bonuses in March, May, July and August.

The bonuses are for “continued perseverance and commitment to our customers” during the novel coronavirus crisis, CEO Marvin Ellison said.

This $100 million in bonuses raises Lowe’s total commitment to workers and communities since the start of the health pandemic in March to $775 million, according to the company.

More than $675 million of that has included pay increases and bonuses, profit-sharing bonuses and telemedicine services to all workers and families, even those not enrolled in the company medical plans.

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Lowe’s Home Improvement employees are getting another round of bonuses amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Lowe’s Companies

Lowe’s also

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Europe’s Banks Get Serious About Work From Home After Covid

(Bloomberg) — So how much will you really be able to work from home after the pandemic? A lot more than you might think, if you work for a European bank.

As some Wall Street executives warn of the perils of working from home for too long, Europe’s biggest lenders are getting serious about using lessons learned in the pandemic to lower costs and afford employees a better work-life balance. They’re changing a culture that has seen few disruptions of this magnitude since modern office buildings were created.

Leading the way in Europe are the Dutch, whose biggest banks predict that staff will be working about half their time from home once the pandemic is over. In Italy, UniCredit SpA plans to have 40% of work done remotely after the crisis, while Switzerland’s UBS Group AG estimates that employees could work from home about a third of the time.



chart, bar chart: Bye-Bye, Office?


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Want a second home during COVID? These Zillow vets have invented a radically less expensive way to buy one

There’s an old truism about vacation homes: Nature wants them back.



Austin Allison wearing a suit and tie: Pacasso's co-founder Austin Allison


© Courtesy of Pacaso
Pacasso’s co-founder Austin Allison

Indeed between the maintenance, upkeep, taxes, hassle of finding short-term renters, and typically small number of days per year homeowners are actually in residence, vacation homes are generally a great way to make memories—and a poor way to invest your money.

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Now two veterans of Zillow have a new spin on second homes—they want to pair you up with likeminded buyers to own just the amount of the house you’ll actually use. Their company, called Pacaso (pronounced like the painter), launched this week. Pacaso’s chairman is Zillow cofounder and former CEO Spencer Rascoff; its CEO is Dotloop founder and former Zillow executive Austin Allison. The company says it has raised $17 million in Series A funding, from investors including Maveron, Crosscut, Global Founders Capital, Howard Schultz, and other Zillow

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